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What Factors Can Cause a Multi-Car Accident in California?

Multi-car accidents tend to be serious for several reasons which are very particular to these types of collisions. The majority of all traffic collisions involving three or more vehicles will involve multiple impacts, which only increases the risk of serious injury and significant property loss.

Let’s dissect the components of a multi-car accident.

There is a first, or primary, impact which occurs when an at-fault driver crashes into another vehicle. Then there is a secondary impact which comes after the initial impact. This chain reaction of collisions usually happens when other drivers are desperately trying to avoid hitting one another or other objects.

Multi-car accidents, however, are often worsened precisely — and ironically — by drivers trying to avoid a collision in the first place. According to the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety (IIHS), about 58 percent of car occupants and passengers were involved in fatal multiple-vehicle crashes in 2020. About 48 percent of these accidents were frontal impacts, while 23 percent were side impacts. The most common age group involved in multi-car accidents were 25 and younger (24 percent). 

If you were involved in a multi-car accident and would like to pursue legal action against the party at-fault for damages, our expert car accident attorneys at West Coast Trial Lawyers are readily available to assist victims of personal injury. With our track record of winning more than 5,000 personal injury cases, we are confident that we will deliver a good outcome to your settlement.

To schedule a free consultation, please contact our 24/7 legal team by calling (888) 982-8128 or filling out our quick contact form.

What Are Common Causes of Multi-Car Accidents?

Multi-car accidents tend to occur on freeways rather than on city streets. The higher speeds on freeways make it that much more difficult for drivers to avoid and react to what are typically sudden and unexpected collisions.

Below are several reasons why multi-car collisions occur:

  • Weather Conditions. Poor weather conditions will inevitably impair a driver’s ability to see the road ahead, reduce their ability to control the vehicle, and diminish reaction times in the event of a sudden pile-up on the freeway. Fog and snow, for obvious reasons, are the two most challenging examples of inclement weather a driver may face.
  • Texting on the Phone. The problem of texting while driving has become so pandemic that many now believe driving and texting is comparable to drinking and driving, as both behaviors can severely impair a driver’s focus and ability to drive safely.
  • Reckless Driving. Instances of aggressive driving are increasingly common. Behaviors such as tailgating, unsafe lane changes, and speeding will only increase the likelihood of a multi-car collision.
  • Driving While Drowsy. Driving while drowsy is a serious threat to everyone on the road. All it takes is one driver to doze off, and the potential for a pile-up can become almost inevitable.

Considerations for Multi-Car Crashes

The most complex issue in cases involving multiple vehicles is identifying the negligent or at-fault driver. These cases tend to involve high dollar amounts, and special investigators may be assigned by the insurance companies to untangle what can become a logistical mess.

The question, therefore, in determining liability, will depend on two legal concepts called duty of care and proximate cause.

  • Duty of Care: All drivers have a responsibility to drive safely and behave in a reasonable manner while behind the wheel. If a driver is found to violate this responsibility, he or she may be found liable for the accident.
  • Proximate Cause: Once issues regarding duty of care have been assessed, a clear connection between that breach and the accident in question needs to be established. Simply put: it must be proven that a driver’s behavior was the proximate cause of the accident.

Another important legal consideration in multi-car collisions is the issue of comparative vs. contributory negligence. The state of California abides by the rules of comparative negligence, which means that a claimant involved in an accident may get compensation against the at-fault driver even if the claimant is partly responsible.

Other Factors to Consider

Multi-car accidents often result in multiple claims and, therefore, usually become severely contested, drawn out affairs. For one, there’s no real standardized method for assigning liability in these types of collisions. Sometimes, one driver will be deemed 100% responsible, and other times multiple drivers may share in the responsibility.

To make sense of this, let’s consider an example. Imagine that one person rear ends another. In doing so, they inadvertently push the car they’ve just hit into another one in front of it. In this case, the driver who initiated the initial impact is responsible for the damages to both.

There are instances when more than one driver can be found liable for contributing to an accident. An example would be when one driver is speeding and runs a red light, but then that driver gets hit by yet another driver who also ran a red light. This second driver then hits a third vehicle in the process. In this case, both drivers who ran their respective red lights would share a degree of responsibility.

Contact Us to Find Out How We Can Help

If you have sustained injuries as a result of a multi-car collision, our qualified car accident attorneys at West Coast Trial Lawyers can help you recover compensation for the losses you have suffered, including medical bills, property damage, lost wages, and pain and suffering. 

Contact us today by calling (888) 982-8128 or filling out our contact form to schedule a free consultation with our experienced, caring, and compassionate legal team.

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